How Much Do Surrogates Get Paid in SC?

Choosing to become a surrogate will likely come from a place of altruism in your heart. Already understanding how life-changing being a parent is, it’s natural that you want to share that gift with others who cannot become parents on their own.

However, a feeling of satisfaction isn’t the only benefit that you get from becoming a surrogate — you have the chance to receive compensation as a surrogate mother in South Carolina beyond the financial reimbursements of pregnancy- and childbirth-related costs. Carrying a child for another family is a huge sacrifice, and our intended parents recognize the importance of surrogate mother compensation in a healthy surrogacy relationship.

To learn more about what kind of surrogate mother pay you may be entitled to if you become a surrogate in South Carolina, you can call us today at 864-573-5533.

What Your Gestational Carrier Compensation Will Look Like

Although some financial provisions may vary depending upon the unique circumstances of a particular match, below is a list of the typical financial provisions presented in a proposed surrogacy contract through our Gestational Carrier Program:

  • Pregnancy Compensation: $25,000 for a first-time carrier ($30,000+ for a proven carrier)
  • Multiples Fee: $5,000 per additional child
  • Invasive Medical Procedure(s): $500-$1,000
  • Cesarean Section Delivery: $2,000
  • Loss of Reproductive Organs: $2,500-$5,000
  • Transfer Compensation: $750
  • Transfer Expense Allowance: $750 (in addition to transfer compensation)
  • Monthly Expense Allowance: $200-$300/month
  • Travel Expenses: Varies
  • Bed Rest Assistance: Childcare up to $200/week and housekeeping up to $85/week
  • Lost Wages: Varies
  • Maternity Clothing: $750 (additional $250 if gestating multiples)
  • Legal Fees: $2,500 (for separate independent legal representation)
  • Counseling Fees: Up to $1,000
  • Insurance and Medical Expenses: Varies
  • Breastmilk: $250/week

Some of these expenses will go directly to the appropriate professionals (for example, your legal fees and medical expenses will likely be paid directly to your attorney and your doctors), while others, including your pregnancy compensation and monthly expenses, will be paid directly to you. This will also be determined ahead of time in your surrogacy agreement.

Your surrogacy compensation may look slightly different from this approximation based on your individual situation.

Base Compensation

So, how do you figure out how much surrogates get paid in base compensation? Your pregnancy compensation will likely fall into the averages stated above, but may vary depending on what you and the intended parents are comfortable with. For example, if you are becoming a surrogate for a friend or family member, you may be comfortable with a lower base compensation than if you were complete strangers beforehand. Whatever the case, this compensation will be negotiated between your lawyers until both parties are happy.

Typically, your base compensation will depend on your experience as a surrogate. A woman who has already completed a surrogacy and proven her success in carrying another person’s child will usually be paid more than a woman who has never been a surrogate before, as the former surrogate’s history eliminates some of the risk involved in the process.

This base compensation, while usually not exorbitant, can certainly serve as a huge step toward reaching your financial goals. Many surrogates use this compensation to put a down payment on a house, pay off their student loans or further their education, start saving for their children’s college education and more.

Pregnancy-Related Expenses

Because a surrogate does not carry a child for her own family, surrogates shouldn’t be expected to pay the financial expenses associated with pregnancy — and you won’t have to. The intended parents will pay for all of your pregnancy-related fees, including all of the screening and legal costs incurred before you even become pregnant.

After you are pregnant, the intended parents will likely cover these pregnancy expenses:

  • Doctor’s appointments and medical bills
  • Travel for appointments
  • Maternity clothes
  • Meals (travel related)
  • Housekeeping and child care (when on bed rest)
  • Prenatal vitamins and other health supplies
  • Wages lost to doctor’s appointments or bed rest
  • And more

These expenses will be determined in your surrogacy contract before you become pregnant. There may be room for additional surrogate mother pay based on your individual circumstances. Remember, the intended parents will pay for all of the surrogacy-related expenses you incur, so becoming a surrogate won’t be a financial burden for you.

To learn more about surrogate mother compensation in South Carolina, contact us today.